Category Archives: bitcoin

General Bitcoin (BTC) stuff.

Bit4coin.net

bitcoin photo contestBitcoin Photo Contest – ends Oct. 15th / 2015
Submit your bitcoin photo
and win €1,000!
bit4coin.net

 

Our mission

With bit4coin we provide the best tool for experienced bitcoiners to attract friends and family to the virtual currency, and a simple and easy-to-use portal into bitcoin for new users. We believe that by turning an abstract technology such as a virtual currency into a physical item like a gift voucher, we make bitcoin much more accessible to new users.
Our goal

We want to support world-wide bitcoin adoption. We believe bitcoin is money from the people, for the people, and want bitcoin to get into as many hands as possible. We are confident bitcoin is ready for the next wave of everyday users, beyond early adopters.
Security of processes and funds

We keep 100% of your funds with banking institutions in the European Union which are subject to deposit insurance. We convert funds to bitcoins when you redeem your vouchers, and keep bitcoins in secure wallets in various locations with multiple layers of security. In addition, we have sufficient funding to ensure reliable business operations.
Our company

We, bit4coin BV, are based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Founded in 2013, we bring a lot of experience: Both co-founders have 8+ years experience in banking, management consulting, finance, and IT.

https://bit4coin.net/bitcoin-photo-contest

What To Do With Old Bitcoin Miners?

What does one do with old bitcoin mining rigs? Two thoughts – Book Holder – Candle Holder!

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Yes your old defunct Butterfly Labs 10 GH/s Bitcoin Miner is still good for something! Why has it come to this? Well from the following screen shot below you can see that my BFL (Butterfly Labs) 10 GH/s bitcoin miners are no longer “up to speed” so to speak when it comes to BTC output. There was a time when these suckers were mining 0.01 bitcoins per day – each! Now it’s TH/s (that’s Terra Hash) that counts. I had a total of six – so the chart below shows today’s estimated output etc. for all six.

Bitcoin Profit Chart
Bitcoin Mining Profit / Output – taken from Alloscomp.com – Bitcoin Mining Calculator

Don’t worry I’m still an avid bitcoin supporter! The best way to acquire them is to sell something for them or buy them directly from a broker as the cost associated with the hardware is exorbitant and soon becomes obsolete!

Rammed Earth Elephant

Here’s a great video of Dominic Snow making one of his Rammed Earth Elephants.

And Now There’s 14

Fourteen bitcoin artists are now listed on Art 4 Bitcoin™! Next stop – TWENTY! Please help me get the work out through social media.

David Platford
David Platford

David Platford

While at the Academy of Art University Dave studied the traditional and contemporary oil painting techniques, as well as the principles of Realism, Pop-Art, Abstract Expressionism, Surrealism, Graphic Design and Easter Aesthetics.

 

 

Julia Hacker
Julia Hacker

Julia Hacker

Her work is very versatile from impressionist landscape and still-life to realistically portrait. The common thread throughout her work demonstrates both whimsical flourish as well as deep symbolism.

 

 

Dominic Snow
Dominic Snow

Dominic Snow

 

 

 

 

A4B_profile2
Get Listed!

Listing on Art 4 Bitcoin™ is free for artists. If you know of any please repost on social media and help me get the word out about artists who sell their works for bitcoin. For more information on getting listed please contact me here.  If your link is already up then a link back to this site is greatly appreciated! Please feel free to use one of these banners or a text link. Please use the social media links below to repost and help get the word out!

Chris

#10 – Manuel “Lolo” Guzman

Manuel “Lolo” Guzman
Lolo’s Art

I’d like to welcome Manuel “Lolo” Guzman as the 10th artist listed on Art 4 Bitcoin™. Lolo is an illustrator / concept artist currently based in New York City’s Brooklyn area. In Guzman’s words:

I live to create stories realized by worlds and lights and characters.

Manuel is available for commissioned works. A sample gallery is here and his website is at www.lolosart.com.

A4B_profile2
Get Listed!

Listing on Art 4 Bitcoin™ is free for artists. If you know of any please repost on social media and help me get the word out about artists who sell their works for bitcoin. For more information on getting listed please contact me here.

 

 

Please use the links below to repost and help get the word out!

Chris

Two More Bitcoin Artists

I’d like to welcome Toby Weston and Chris Schillinger to the list of artists who sell their works for bitcoin!

Toby Weston
Toby Weston

Toby Weston is working as a commercial digital artist and graphic designer in modern printing and digital production. His recent work draws upon technology as inspiration, medium and tool. Toby recognises the glitches and artefacts of the digital as visible brushstrokes which add authenticity and texture. Technologies relentless alienating march is the landscape to be explored.

 

Chris Schillinger

Chris Schillinger is a Toronto artist who works with acrylic and mixed media on both board and canvas. Abstract is his main focus with a growing focus on the use of resins.

 

 

 

A4B_profile2
Get Listed

Listing on Art 4 Bitcoin™ is free for artists. If you know of any please repost on social media and help me get the word out about artists who sell their works for bitcoin. For more information on getting listed please contact me here.

 

 

Chris

 

 

 

I Just Found a Great Description of Bitcoin

From a bitcoin forum called www.bitcointalk.org: Forget most things you’ve heard.  People discover Bitcoin in a variety of ways, but usually pick up some sort of misconception like “Bitcoin gives free money to people with computers” or “in order to use Bitcoin I have to use a program that wastes electricity for nothing” along the way.  Here is a good summary to help you understand Bitcoin in general, by focusing on what Bitcoin is and what problem it solves.  These two things are not typically well explained on most websites, and it is difficult to appreciate just how effective a technology Bitcoin is until they are understood.

What Bitcoin is:  An agreement amongst a community of people to use 21 million secure mathematical tokens–“bitcoins”–as money, like traditional African and Asian societies used the money cowry.  Unlike the money cowry:

  • there will never be more bitcoins
  • they are impossible to counterfeit
  • they can be divided into as small of pieces as you want
  • and they can be transferred instantly across great distances via a digital connection such as the internet.


This is accomplished by the use of powerful cryptography many times stronger than that used by banks.  Instead of simply being “sent” coins have to be cryptographically signed over from one entity to another, essentially putting a lock and key on each token so that bitcoins can be securely backed up in multiple places, and so that copying doesn’t increase the amount you own.

Because bitcoins are given their value by the community, they don’t need to be accepted by anyone else or backed by any authority to succeed.  They are like a local currency except much, much more effective and local to the whole world.  As an example of how effective the community is at “backing” the bitcoin: on April 4th 2011 30,000 bitcoins were abruptly sold on the largest Bitcoin exchange, consuming nearly all “buy” offers on the order book and dropping the price by nearly 1/3.  But within a couple of days, the price on the exchange had fully rebounded and bitcoins were again trading at good volumes, with large “buy” offers slowly replacing the ones consumed by the trades.  The ability of such a small economy (there were only 5 million out of the total 21 million bitcoins circulating then, or about 3.75 million USD worth at then-current exchange rates) to absorb such a large sell-off without crashing shows that bitcoins were already working beautifully.

What problem Bitcoin solves:  Mathematically, the specific implementation of the bitcoin protocol solves the problem of “how to do all of the abovewithout trusting anyone“.  If that sounds amazing, it should!  Normally a local currency has to trust all kinds of people for it to be able to work.  So does a national currency.  And in both cases, that trust is often abused.  But with Bitcoin, there’s no one person who can abuse the system.  Nobody can print more money, nobody can re-use the coins simply by making a copy, and nobody can use anyone else’s coins without having direct access to their keys.  People who break its mathematical “rules” simply end up creating a whole different system incompatible with the first.  As long as these rules are followed by someone, the only way Bitcoin can fail is for everyone to stop using it.

This marvelous quality of not having to trust anyone is achieved in two ways.  First, through the use of cutting-edge cryptography.  Cryptography ensures that only the owner of the bitcoins has the authority to spend them.  The cryptography used in Bitcoin is so strong that all the world’s online banking would be compromised before Bitcoin would be, and it can even be upgraded if that were to start to happen.  It’s like if each banknote in your pocket had a 100-digit combination lock on it that couldn’t be removed without destroying the bill itself.  Bitcoin is that secure.

But the second way of securing the system, called the blockchain, is where the real magic happens.  The blockchain is a single, authoritative record of confirmed transactions which is stored on the peer to peer Bitcoin network.  Even with top-notch digital encryption, if there was no central registry to show that certain bitcoins had already been “paid” to someone else, you could sign over the same coins to multiple people in what’s called a double-spend attack, like writing cheques for more money than you have in your account.  Normally this is prevented by a central authority, the bank, who keeps track of all the cheques you write and makes sure they don’t exceed the amount of money you have.  Even so, most people won’t accept a cheque from you unless they really trust you, and the bank has to spend a lot of money physically protecting those central records, whether they are kept in a physical or digital form.  Not to mention, sometimes a bank employee can abuse their position of trust.  And, in traditional banking, the bank itself doesn’t have to follow the rules you do–it can lend out more money than it actually has.

The blockchain fixes all these problems by creating a single master registry of the already-cryptographically-secured bitcoin transfers, verifying them and locking them down in a highly competitive market called mining.  In return for this critical role, the Bitcoin community rewards miners with a set amount of bitcoins per block, taken from the original limited quantity on a pre-agreed schedule.  As that original amount gradually runs out, this reward will be replaced by fees paid to prioritise one transaction over another–again in a highly competitive market to ensure the lowest possible cost.  The transactions are verified and locked in by the computational work of mining in a very special way so that no one else can change the official record of transactions without doing more computational work than the cumulative work of all miners across the whole network.

In conclusion:  All this mathematical technology may be a bit of a mouthful, but what it means in practice is that Bitcoin works just like cash.  Bitcoin transactions are intentionally irreversible–unlike credit cards or PayPal where chargebacks can invalidate a payment that has already been made.  And there are no middlemen.  Transactions are completed directly between the sender and the receiver via the peer to peer network.

Because of Bitcoin’s intricate design, the network remains secure no matter where or how you process Bitcoin transactions.  Which is incredible–no one else has ever tried to create a system that worked this way!  All previous monetary systems have relied on trusting somebody, whether it was the king, town hall, the federal reserve, or banks.  Bitcoin doesn’t.  It’s guaranteed instead by the laws of mathematics, and that’s why it has everyone from technologists to economists very excited.  I’m sure you have lots more questions, so scan the index below to see if they’ve been asked before, then dive in!  The so-called “canonical” threads linked from this index are considered newbie-friendly zones; outside of them you’re welcome to try your own luck.

For the full post and thread please check out www.bitcointalk.org. Chris

New Linkedin Discussion Group for Art 4 Bitcoin™

A4B_100x50Hello everyone,

I’ve recently put together a Linkedin Group page to discuss all things Artist and Bitcoin related!

You can find it here at the Art 4 Bitcoin™ Linkedin Group Page.

If you’re a Linkedin member please join the group and feel free to start a discussion.

Chris

 

Artists added in May

I’d like to welcome Alex Vera, Molly Crabapple and Zen O’conor to the list of artists who sell their works for bitcoin.

 

Alex Vera
Alex Vera

Alex Vera is a pop artist who is inspired by the works of Keith Haring and Pablo Picasso. His works have been exhibited in Art Basel Miami 2011, Sleepless Nights Miami 2011, and can be found in galleries across the U.S.

 

 

 

Molly Crabapple
Molly Crabapple

Molly Crabapple is an artist and writer in New York. Her 2013 solo exhibition, Shell Game, led to her being called “Occupy’s greatest artist” by Rolling Stone, and “an emblem of the way that art could break out of the gilded gallery” by The New Republic.

 

 

 

Zen O'Conor
Zen O’Conor

Zen O’conor travelled to Italy, France, Belgium and the USA in search of the best education and most skilled masters of art. He worked through an intensive four year academic training program in less that two years. Upon his completion of his training he was invited for a further two year apprenticeship under skilled and well renowned academic masters.

 

 

A4B_profile2Listing on Art 4 Bitcoin™ is free for artists. If you know of any please repost on social media and help me get the word out about artists who sell their works for bitcoin. For more information on getting listed please contact me here.

Chris

 

 

Oli Witcomb

Oli Witcomb

“Coinsketch – Swapping sketches for bitcoin since 2014!”

I’d like to welcome Oli Witcomb to the list of Art 4 Bitcoin™ artists. His website is Coinsketch and a sample gallery of his work can be found here. Oli is from the UK and his focus is sketching. His work is in the 0.04 – 0.06 BTC price range and he offers free wallpaper downloads for your desktop. Please help me get the word about about Oli’s site by posting links on all your social media profiles like Facebook and Twitter. If you are an artist or know of any it’s free to list a site on Art 4 Bitcoin™. Chris contact/get listed